Suellen Walker

TOPIC: Pain Memory: How Early Pain Modulates Nociception and Perception

suellen walkerTITLES AND INSTITUTIONS:

  • Dr Suellen Walker1,2
  • MBBS MMed MSc PhD FANZCA FFPMANZCA
  • Reader and Consultant in Paediatric Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine
  • Developmental Neurosciences, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK.
  • Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, Great Ormond St Hospital for Children, London, UK.

AREAS OF RESEARCH:

Dr Walker held Consultant posts in paediatric anaesthesia and pain medicine in Melbourne and Sydney, completed a Masters in Pain Medicine at University of Sydney, and was a Foundation Fellow of the Faculty of Pain Medicine, Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists when it formed in 1999. Suellen subsequently moved to London to pursue developmental pain research, completing an MSc in Neuroscience at UCL, followed by a PhD.

Dr Walker’s current post includes clinical practice in paediatric anaesthesia and pain medicine. Her clinical and translational laboratory research relates to the developmental neurobiology of pain, developmental pharmacodynamics of analgesics, and long-term effects of neonatal pain. Her research is currently funded by the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity, Medical Research Council UK and Royal College of Anaesthetists/British Journal of Anaesthesia UK. She has received the IASP Bonica Fellowship, IASP Pain in Children New Investigator Award and was the Macintosh Professor, Royal College of Anaesthetists UK in 2012. She is currently Chair of the Scientific Committee, Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of UK and Ireland and Member of the Scientific Council, National Institute of Academic Anaesthesia, UK. 

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:

  • Walker SM, Beggs S, Baccei M. Persistent changes in peripheral and spinal nociceptive processing after early tissue injury. Experimental Neurol 275(2):253-60; 2016
  • Chang P, Walker SM, Fitzgerald M. Differential suppression of spontaneous and noxious-evoked somatosensory cortical activity by isoflurane in the neonatal rat. Anesthesiology 124:885-98; 2016
  • Walker SM, Fitzgerald M, Hathway G. Surgical injury in the neonatal rat alters the adult pattern of descending modulation from the rostroventral medulla Anesthesiology 122: 1391-400; 2015
  • Schwaller F, Beggs S, Walker SM. Targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase to reduce the impact of neonatal microglial priming on incision-induced hyperalgesia in the adult rat. Anesthesiology 122: 1377-90; 2015
  • Hamurtekin E, Fitzsimmons BL, Shubayev VI, Grafe M, Deumens R, Yaksh TL, Walker SM. Evaluation of spinal toxicity and long-term spinal reflex function following intrathecal levobupivacaine in the neonatal rat. Anesthesiology 119(1):142-155; 2013
  • Walker SM, Grafe M, Yaksh TL. Intrathecal clonidine in the neonatal rat: dose-dependent analgesia and evaluation of spinal apoptosis and toxicity. Anesth Analg 115:450-460; 2012
  • Beggs S, Currie G, Salter MW, Fitzgerald M, Walker SM. Priming of adult pain responses by neonatal pain experience: maintenance by central neuroimmune activity. Brain 135:404-17; 2012
  • Walker SM. Pain after surgery in children: clinical recommendations. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 28:570-576; 2015
  • McGrath P, Stevens B, Walker S, Zempsky W (eds). Oxford Textbook of Paediatric Pain. Oxford University Press pp 1-688; 2014
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